(cMailman.Message Message qoq}q(U_headersq]q((U Return-PathU#tq(U X-Original-ToUkosar@list.dimnet.hutq(U Delivered-ToUkosar@list.dimnet.hutq(UReceivedU~from dimnet (localhost [127.0.0.1]) by dimnet.hu (Postfix) with ESMTP id 36B0B114C3C4; Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:29:57 +0100 (CET)tq (UX-Virus-ScannedUamavisd-new at dimnet.hutq (UReceivedUśfrom dimnet.hu ([127.0.0.1]) by dimnet (dimnet.hu [127.0.0.1]) (amavisd-new, port 10024) with ESMTP id G3hlWsX8GXAB; Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:29:56 +0100 (CET)tq (UReceivedU from lockatoo.us (unknown [198.12.111.46]) by dimnet.hu (Postfix) with ESMTP id E7F83114C3A1 for ; Fri, 21 Nov 2014 21:29:44 +0100 (CET)tq (UReceivedUŽby lockatoo.us id hdugm00001gl for ; Fri, 21 Nov 2014 12:27:15 -0800 (envelope-from )tq (U MIME-VersionU1.0tq(UFromU;"HealthierChoicesToday" tq(UToUtq(USubjectUjRE: kosar@list.dimnet.hu - How Kidney Beans Work (Explained in article) - Issue#17715 on November 21, 2014tq(U Content-TypeUtext/html; charset="us-ascii"tq(UContent-Transfer-EncodingUquoted-printabletq(U Message-IDU-<0.0.0.48.1D005C989ABE1E8.1C1648@lockatoo.us>qtq(UDateUFri, 21 Nov 2014 12:32:32 -0800tqeU_payloadqTŐ Never Diet Again

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- ******************************* All described in this letter is represented as an ad. SIMPLE-1NF0 P0.B0X./4120 N.49824 ------------ P0RT1AND_0REG0N 97208 \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ - Stop receiving these messages: http://lockatoo.us/Z1soaaOiJ8xBI6LSKfKTES5tAlZffjDWnp27DuxU4f40rA6udxV1meHBPwXeDDqJqvccAHusxMOwdfPB9xFy+6xwmDappjOHIyjbgvQS10IiEYags5dk5ebtYnAVKde0/s0OFhe1s3Y6bEdcPpl0 -- is visit at first caused great perturbation; but Svidriga=EFlov could be very fascinating when he liked, so that the first, and indeed very intelligent surmise of the sensible parents that Svidriga=EFlov had probably had so much to drink that he did not know what he was doing vanished immediately. The decrepit father was wheeled in to see Svidriga=EFlov by the tender and sensible mother, who as usual began the conversation with various irrelevant questions. She never asked a direct question, but began by smiling and rubbing her hands and then, if she were obliged to ascertain something--for instance, when Svidriga=EFlov would like to have the wedding--she would begin by interested and almost eager questions about Paris and the court life there, and only by degrees brought the conversation round to Third Street. On other occasions this had of course been very impressive, but this time Arkady Ivanovitch seemed particularly impatient, and insisted on seeing his betrothed at once, though he had been informed, to begin with, that she had already gone to bed. The girl of course appeared. Svidriga=EFlov informed her at once that he was obliged by very important affairs to leave Petersburg for a time, and therefore brought her fifteen thousand roubles and begged her accept them as a present from him, as he had long been intending to make her this trifling present before their wedding. The logical connection of the present with his immediate departure and the absolute necessity of visiting them for that purpose in pouring rain at midnight was not made clear. But it all went off very well; even the inevitable ejaculations of wonder and regret, the inevitable questions were extraordinarily few and restrained. On the other hand, the gratitude expressed was most glowing and was reinforced by tears from the most sensible of mothers. Svidriga=EFlov got up, laughed, kissed his betrothed, patted her cheek, declared he would soon come back, and noticing in her eyes, together with childish curiosity, a sort of earnest dumb inquiry, reflected and kissed her again, though he felt sincere anger inwardly at the thought that his present would be immediately locked up in the keeping of the most sensible of mothers. He went away, leaving them all in a state of extraordinary excitement, but the tender mamma, speaking quietly in a half whisper, settled some of the most important of their doubts, concluding that Svidriga=EFlov was a great man, a man of great affairs and connections and of great wealth--there was no knowing what he had in his mind. He would start off on a journey and give away money just as the fancy took him, so that there was nothing surprising about it. Of course it was strange that he was wet through, but Englishmen, for instance, are even more eccentric, and all these people of high society didn't think of what was said of them and didn't stand on ceremony. Possibly, indeed, he came like that on purpose to show that he was not afraid of anyone. Above all, not a word should be said about it, for God knows what might come of it, and the money must be locked up, and it was most fortunate that Fedosya, the cook, had not left the kitchen. And above all not a word must be said to that old cat, Madame Resslich, and so on and so on. They sat up whispering till two o'clock, but the girl went to bed much earlier, amazed and rather sorrowful. Svidriga=EFlov meanwhile, exactly at midnight, crossed the bridge on the way back to the mainland. The rain had ceased and there was a roaring wind. He began shivering, and for one moment he gazed at the black waters of the Little Neva with a look of special interest, even inquiry. But he soon felt it very cold, standing by the water; he turned and went towards Y. Prospect. He walked along that endless street for a long time, almost half an hour, more than once stumbling U_charsetqNUepilogueqNU _default_typeqU text/plainqU _unixfromqU@From HealthierChoicesToday@lockatoo.us Fri Nov 21 21:29:57 2014Udefectsq]U __version__q(KKKtqUpreambleq Nub.