(cMailman.Message Message qoq}q(U_headersq]q((U Return-PathUtq(U X-Original-ToUkosar@list.dimnet.hutq(U Delivered-ToUkosar@list.dimnet.hutq(UReceivedU~from dimnet (localhost [127.0.0.1]) by dimnet.hu (Postfix) with ESMTP id B858F114C425; Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:53:26 +0100 (CET)tq (UX-Virus-ScannedUamavisd-new at dimnet.hutq (U X-Spam-FlagUYEStq (U X-Spam-ScoreU4.325tq (U X-Spam-LevelU****tq (U X-Spam-StatusUøYes, score=4.325 tagged_above=4 required=4.31 tests=[ADMAIL=2.799, BAYES_50=0.8, DIET_1=0.001, HTML_MESSAGE=0.001, MIME_HTML_ONLY=0.723, MIME_QP_LONG_LINE=0.001, T_END_FUTURE_EMAILS=0.01, T_RP_MATCHES_RCVD=-0.01] autolearn=no autolearn_force=notq(UReceivedUœfrom dimnet.hu ([127.0.0.1]) by dimnet (dimnet.hu [127.0.0.1]) (amavisd-new, port 10024) with ESMTP id C7nPpz8wbo91; Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:53:12 +0100 (CET)tq(UReceivedUªfrom litreas.us (hestia.litreas.us [104.168.46.140]) by dimnet.hu (Postfix) with ESMTP id 3A8F0114C3C7 for ; Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:53:04 +0100 (CET)tq(UReceivedU‰by litreas.us id hi7ude0001g8 for ; Wed, 17 Dec 2014 13:50:51 -0800 (envelope-from )tq(U MIME-VersionU1.0tq(UFromU4"TrendingLifestyles" tq(UToUtq(USubjectUjRE: kosar@list.dimnet.hu - How Kidney Beans Work (Explained in article) - Issue#89496 on December 17, 2014tq(U Content-TypeUtext/html; charset="us-ascii"tq(UContent-Transfer-EncodingUquoted-printabletq(U Message-IDU,<0.0.0.6A.1D01A438655EB7C.5B0A87@litreas.us>qtq(UDateUWed, 17 Dec 2014 13:59:51 -0800tqeU_payloadqTÇ Never Diet Again

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- SIMPLE_INFO POBOX412O NUMBER_49824 PORTLAND_OR 97208 This has been brought to you as an ad-message - Stop receiving these messages: http://litreas.us/Z1woeabSdJEfcbaBeOanEy9nSwIFOy6LlpixDOVftaM9/lnoJlZpi7KQZE6YBC3d/6lPUjT5gNb0JK+V/xZy7Ox7nT6mpDiaNH+Ciq1MkRBjEtOt7s0hofq5PitPatCnrogeVUm/uXk/bEdcPpl0 -- orments which she shall suffer: First shee shall dwell within the paunch of an Asse: secondly her nosethrilles shall receive a carraine stinke of the beast: thirdly shee shall dye for hunger: last of all, shee shall finde no meane to ridde her selfe from her paines, for her hand shalt be sowen up within the skinne of the Asse: This being said, all the Theeves consented, and when I (poore Asse) heard and understood all their device, I did nothing else but lament and bewayle my dead carkasse, which should be handled in such sort on the next morrow. THE SEVENTH BOOKE THE TWENTY-FOURTH CHAPTER How hee that was left behinde at Hippata did bring newes concerning the robbery of Miloes house, came home and declared to his Company, that all the fault was laid to one Apuleius his charge. A soone as night was past, and the cleare Chariot of the Sunne had spred his bright beames on every coast, came one of the company of the theeves, (for so his and their greeting together did declare) who at the first entry into the Cave (after hee had breathed himselfe, and was able to speake) told these tydings unto his companions in this sort. Sirs, as touching the house of Milo of Hippata, which we forcibly entred and ransackt the last day, we may put away all feare and doubt nothing at all. For after that ye by force of armes, had spoyled and taken away all things in the house, and returned hither into our Cave; I (thrusting my selfe amongst the presse of the people, and shewing my selfe as though I were sad and sorrowful for the mischance) consulted with them for the boulting out of the matter, and devising what meanes might be wrought for the apprehension of the theeves, to the intent I might learne and see all that was done to make relation thereof unto you as you willed me, insomuch that the whole fact at length by manifest and evident proofes as also by the common opinion and judgement of the people, was laid to one Lucius Apuleius charge as manifest author of this common robbery, who a few dayse before by false and forged letters and colored honesty, fell so farre in favour with this Milo, that he entertained him into his house, and received him as a chiefe of his familiar friends, which Lucius after that he had sojourned there a good space, and won the heart of Miloes Maid, by fained love, did thoroughly learne the waies and doores of all the house, and curiously viewed the cofers and chests, wherein was laid the whole substance of Milo: neither was there small cause given to judge him culpable, since as the very same night that this robbery was done he fled away, and could not be found in no place: and to the intent hee might cleane escape, and better prevent such as made hew and crie after him, he tooke his white horse and galloped away, and after this, his servant was found in the house, who (accused as accessary to the fellony and escape of his Master) was committed t U_charsetqNUepilogueqNU _default_typeqU text/plainqU _unixfromq U